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Rv Campgrounds When Visiting Tourist Spots In Casper, Wyoming

By Joseph Pressley

With the use of recreational vehicles, you can travel by road and go to places which you have never been before. One of the states where you can explore the beauty of its different sites is in Wyoming specifically in the city of Casper. It is considered as the second largest city in the state and is nicknamed as the ‘Oil City’. It has a lot of natural and historic sites for your viewing pleasure and it would give you a great time of camping.

There are different historical spots that you can visit in this city. One of which is the National Historic Trails Interpretative Center which is a museum built in commemoration of the Oregon Trail History. There are other museums to go to which can be very educational for your kids and after a long day, you can camp inside your RV while having a good view of the beautiful mountains. There are a lot of RV campgrounds available for you.

One of the RV parks in Casper is the Fort Caspar. It is just next to the well-known Fort Caspar Museum where you have the chance to see different exhibits tracing the rich history of the area. You can stay in the place for the whole day and even for the night as you enjoy their different amenities such as a chance to go fishing in their ponds and some game rooms.

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Moreover, you can stay in the Casper Mountain where they have campgrounds available for you anytime of the year. But you must inquire for their services because some of their sites do not have hookups just like the campsites in Wyoming Bureau of Land Management. It would just be a good place to stay for a while. You must make sure that you have charged all the things with batteries and make use of your stun gun flashlight while putting up your campfire when you stay for the night.

Another ideal camping site for your RV when you go on vacation with your family in this city is at Casper East. It offers a lot of services. If you need to access on the internet, you can do so and check your mail. There is a playground for the kids and an ice cream vendor waiting nearby. You can also visit the library or their shop to see what they have that interest you. Other than that, you can have a relaxing dip at their hot tub.

Lastly, The KOA Kampground in Casper is situated at a place where you have the chance to have an overlooking view of the city. It has all the services that you need when you go on an RV. You get the chance to play at the tennis court nearby and at their miniature golf course. You can also park your vehicle while you plan to visit the city with the use of your bike.

These are the possible camping grounds for your recreational vehicle when you plan to visit the natural and historical sites in Casper, Wyoming. Inquire about their services and stuff your vehicle with everything that you need. Streetwise stun guns would be good protective devices when you travel to a new place using your RV. Arrange reservations ahead of time when you plan to go during peak seasons.

About the Author: Joseph Pressley is a certified TASER instructor and a Tae Kwon Do black belt and a father of two. He is the co-founder of BestStunGun.com which provides the best selection of

stun gun

and

pepper mace

for self defense. To learn more on how these products can save your life, please visit http://www.beststungun.com.

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Two Keys To Leadership Confidence}

Submitted by: Kevin Eikenberry

Everyone is about to move from the reception to the big business dinner. You are walking with some friends and colleagues, following the crowd as you pass the restrooms. Just ahead of you is one of the executives walking as confidently as they normally do, because they cant see what you see that they have a too-long-not-to-be-noticed trail of toilet paper stuck to their left shoe.

Some people are laughing and pointing. Some are feeling sorry for the unknowing executive and some are trying to decide if they should tell them or not. It is likely they remain quiet as that is the easier and lower risk course of action.

Weve all been there.

And it isnt just about toilet paper, is it?

There are things that we dont know, that, because we dont know we cant change or address. There are things in our leadership lives that are much like the toilet paper unknown to us yet seen and known by others. And as embarrassing as the toilet paper is, there are far more important and uncomfortable things you might not know about . . .

And we dont know for the same reasons people didnt tell the executive at the reception some honestly caring, but not knowing what to say, after all, you are the boss; some taking a bit of glee in the humor of the situation; and some who remain quiet because the assume you will figure it out or that you must already know about it . . .

But as long as you dont know, you cant do anything about it, can you?

And the problem is bigger and riskier as a leader because, whether we like it or not, everyone is always watching us, noticing us, and our strengths and weaknesses have a huge impact our ability to help them succeed.

So when we lack awareness and the confidence we can build from it we are hurt but so is our team.

People dont usually talk about this at business dinners or planning meetings but for a variety of reasons your lack of awareness of how you operate could be the biggest barrier to your confidence and success.

It is easier to build your confidence and avoid the embarrassment of the unknown, once you are aware of your strengths and weaknesses, from the perspective of others. After all, as a leader, at some level their perception matters more than reality and if you dont know what their perceptions are, and if there isnt a safe way for them to tell you, you might be toting some toilet paper on your shoe for a long time.

So what are the two keys I promised in the title? What are the two things that will help you become more aware so you can avoid the uncertainty of the unknown (and previously unknowable)?

360 Assessments and Coaching.

Im a big believer in both of these and there are lots of reasons people will talk about why they are helpful. Increasing your confidence isnt usually on the list of benefits people discuss, but it might be the most important of all.

Because we all know that when we are more confident at anything we perform better. That is true at anything from baking a cake, to giving a presentation, to shooting pool, to being a leader.

You might not have a glaring, far-worse-than-toilet-paper-on-your-shoe flaw or weakness, and yet until you ask, until you have a way to get some feedback, you will never know.

If you are looking to build your confidence and reduce your worry and anxiety about blind spots and how others view you as a leader, we can help. Fill out the form on this page and a member of my team will contact you to discuss your specific situation with you and help you with coaching or 360 assessment services. If you want to learn more about our specific Remarkable Leadership 360 assessment, you can do that here too.

About the Author: Join leaders from around the world as a member of the Remarkable Leadership Learning System. This system includes two complimentary months of that unique system as part of Kevin Eikenberry’s Most Remarkable Free Leadership Gift Ever today at

MostRemarkableFreeLeadershipGiftEver.com

. Kevin Eikenberry is a leadership expert and the Chief Potential Officer of The Kevin Eikenberry Group, a learning consulting company that helps Clients reach their potential through a variety of training, consulting and speaking services. You can learn more about him and a special offer on his newest book, Remarkable Leadership: Unleashing Your Leadership Potential One Skill at a time, at

RemarkableLeadershipBook.com/bonuses.asp

.

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Genetic link to migraines discovered by researchers

Monday, September 27, 2010

New research published in the journal Nature Medicine has shown a link between a faulty gene and migraines. Scientists hope that this discovery will lead to improved pain management treatments for sufferers, with possible benefits for pain treatment generally.

The breakthrough involves a gene known as TRESK, thought to control the brain’s reaction to pain: if it is defective, then many normal activities and actions will be painful. Migraine sufferers (thought in the United Kingdom to number about eight per cent of men and eighteen per cent of women) often complain that light, noise and touch cause pain. TRESK can potentially be affected by drugs that would change the point at which it reports pain, which would alleviate the suffering of those with migraines. Now researchers will need to find such a drug.

The study involved scientists from the Medical Research Council Functional Genomics Unit at the University of Oxford and from Canada. They looked at the DNA of 110 people with migraine and members of their family, and found that TRESK was a major component in migraines. One of the Oxford researchers, consultant neurologist Zameel Cader, described it as a “once in a generation find” and said that it could “potentially lead to a treatment for pain in general.” Before this study, no genes had been directly linked to migraines, although parts of the DNA that raised the general risk had been found.

Migraines are described by the World Health Organisation as a major worldwide cause of disability. In Britain, it is estimated that migraines affect 20 per cent of the population, with about 190,000 migraines occurring daily and over 25 million lost days from work every year. Lee Tomkin, director of a sufferers’ charity, Migraine Action, described the news as “fantastic” and “genuinely a really great step forward.” Professor Peter Goadsby from the Migraine Trust termed it “a novel direction to consider new therapies in this very disabling condition.”

Mothers, teachers concerned about leukemia deaths at California elementary school

Saturday, May 28, 2005

California State Senator Joseph Dunn, school officials, and environmental professionals met with Kennedy Elementary School parents in a town-hall style meeting in Santa Ana Thursday evening. The parents aired their concerns over health issues at schools and workplaces, including a rash of leukemia cases in the student population, and began a dialogue they have been working toward for years.

Representatives of Markland Manufacturing and of AQMD also spoke at the meeting, explaining their positions. The outcome of the meeting was that Senator Dunn and members of the community will tour the Markland facility and meet with county officials, and another public meeting will be held in a couple of weeks.

Contents

  • 1 Town hall meeting called in response to concerns
  • 2 Meeting report in detail
  • 3 Sources
  • 4 Media
  • 5 External links

Dell joins Microsoft-Nortel VoIP Team

Saturday, October 20, 2007

Dell Inc. announced on Tuesday that it will partner up with the Microsoft-Nortel Innovative communications alliance (ICA) team to sell Unified Communications and VoIP products.

The announcement on Tuesday the 16th of October 2007 includes Dell selling VoIP, data and wireless networking products from Nortel and the Microsoft Office Communications Server 2007 and other unified communications products.

The partnership with both manufacturers should allow Dell to provide a pre-integrated solution.

In March 2007, competitors IBM and Cisco announced they would join in the competition for developing unified communications applications and the development of open technologies around the unified communications and collaboration (UC2) client platform an application programming interfaces (APIs) offered by IBM as a subset of Lotus Sametime.

“We want to make it simple for our customers to deploy unified communications so their end users can get access to all their messages in one place – whether its e-mail, phone or mobile device. This will pave the way for more business-ready productivity tools,” said vice president of solutions, Dell Product Group, Rick Becker.

  • Customers have four options:
    • Core Office Communication Server 2007 – provides instant messaging and on-premise Microsoft Live Meeting.
    • Office Communication Server: Telephony – enables call routing tracking and management, VoIP gateway and public branch exchange (PBX) integration.
    • Audio and Video Conferencing – allows point-to-point conference, video conference and VoIP audio conference.
    • Exchange Unified Messaging – provides voicemail, e-mail and fax in Microsoft Outlook, and anywhere access of Microsoft Outlook Inbox and Calendar.

Protecting Your Childs Health During The Monsoons}

Submitted by: Krishna Mahathi

Double standards do not agitate me anymore. I have come to believe that most of us have three sets of standards: one that we set for ourselves and rationalise if we dont attain, one that we set for others and judge instantly if they dont attain and then there is the standard we set for our children. We want their lives to be fool proof and somehow ignore the whispers of wisdom to let them be. Every season has gifts to give and rain is always welcome after scorching summers. I used to love getting drenched, sipping warm tea and eating snacks at a roadside shack and dream away as I travelled on a wet evening. Ironically, I shield my daughter from the first trickle because it is acid rain; I think twice before giving her anything to eat, and travel cautiously. Gradually, I have learnt to let my child indulge in some zingy stuff. Monsoon also heralds a frenzied spell in the paediatric wards and we sort of rally around squeamishly till Christmas time. There is a tussle handling surplus beds, reports and distraught family members. So today I want to discuss some things which will let your little enjoy the pleasures of this weather mindfully.

Preventive measures taken to ensure your childs good health are certainly worth the effort. While we still have no licensed vaccines against dengue fever or malaria, the mosquitos carrying the tormentors can be done away with to a great extent. Please ensure that you have no areas with stagnant water in your surroundings, like empty flower pots, discarded tyres, the space below the air conditioner, construction debris, etc. These are ideal breeding grounds for mosquitoes. Have your area sprayed with insecticides and get the drains securely closed when the rains are around the corner. Mosquito nets are more reliable than repellents. Citronella oil (can be added to the floor cleaning disinfectant or placed in a diffuser), camphor and clove (burnt in the evening time indoors) are effective natural remedies. Flies and rodents need to combatted as well if you live in Mumbai like I do. The species we encounter here are extraordinarily adapted for survival. A vigilant watch over bathroom and washbasin drains should be done before monsoons arrive. Ensure that food items are properly stored and covered.

Digestion slows down during this season and unlike us children may not be interested in fried snacks and dairy products. A diet that includes helpings of soups along with antioxidant rich veggies and fruits is more agreeable. So enjoy the pumpkins, bottle guards, bitter guards and bell peppers. Root vegetables and those which grow close to the soil (like cabbage) need to be washed thoroughly avoid eating them raw. Sprout legumes at home in a dry area. Greens need not be avoided altogether. Steam the leaves before adding them to your recipes.

Let children carry boiled and filtered water wherever they travel. They need to be well hydrated as sweat does not evaporate easily in the humid weather. I also think that soaking their water bottles and lunch boxes in boiled water for a minute after a good wash is helpful. Water needs to be boiled the right way. Once bubbles appear continue boiling for four minutes at least before switching off.

Hand washing with soap and water (preferably warm) for at least one full minute is a vital part of disease control. Remind children to do it whenever they return indoors.

Clothing and footwear should be chosen wisely in this weather. It is more appropriate to wear cotton clothes that allow air circulation than just switch to stuffy jackets. Invest in additional innerwear this season as clothes take longer to dry completely and iron them before use. Keep childrens sweaty areas dry as fungal infections are common this time of the year. You can continue to apply prickly heat powders too. Feet should also be kept dry and cotton socks are preferable for school. They should be removed immediately if soaked. Gum boots and clogs are a good investment, along with raincoats.

If the mats and mattresses feel humid dust them with baking /cooking soda and vacuum over them. This is an effective way of ensuring that they are dry.

There is no need to restrict warm baths because it is raining outside. This is counterproductive. Remember to add antiseptics to the water and dry hair quickly.

Avoid travel in overcrowded vehicles as much as possible.

Restricted outdoor play can be compensated with quality time at home. You can cook and read with your school going kid or attempt doing a piece of craftwork. It may also be the right time to have a heart to heart talk with your teenager.

So let the rain not dampen your spirits, let it soak you up in enthusiasm instead.

About the Author: Dr. Krishna Mahathi holds diplomas in Pediatrics and in the management of allergies and asthma. Years of working and interacting with children and parents have given her insight into developmental disabilities. She wishes that there was more awareness and acceptance of the issues that differently-abled children face and hopes that through this blog, she can enable thse children and their families to make sensible and informed choices.

parentedge.in/blog

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Fernando Alonso takes pole at 2009 Hungarian Grand Prix, Felipe Massa badly injured

Saturday, July 25, 2009

Renault driver Fernando Alonso takes pole in a qualification session on Saturday for tomorrow’s 2009 ING Magyar Nagydij at Hungaroring, Budapest, Hungary.

Two Red Bull cars also with Renault engines are right on the back of the Spaniard.

McLaren-Mercedes drivers Lewis Hamilton and Heikki Kovalainen are split by Nico Rosberg‘s Williams 5th on the starting grid.

Kimi Raikkonen qualified 7th for Ferrari.

His teammate Felipe Massa was taken out of the track by a medical helicopter after a violent crash straight into the wall of tyres. A Ferrari spokesman says Brazilian driver “will remain in intensive care, although the team does not know how long he will stay under observation. He was conscious and in stable condition when he arrived at AEK hospital by helicopter with a concussion.” Later Massa underwent a successful surgery on fractured skull. It was said Massa was knocked unconscious after debris striked his helmet.

On Sunday July 19, Formula Two driver Henry Surtees, 18 year old son of 1964 Formula One champion John Surtees, died in hospital after suffering severe head injuries. During the race at Brands Hatch Jack Clarke crashed his car into the wall and sent one of its wheels across the circuit. The wheel impacted precisely with the head of Surtees.

The F1 rookie driver Jaime Alguersuari, who was a team-mate of Surtees at the British F3 season finale at Donington Park last year, and now will drive a Toro Rosso in a race for the first time, wrote the words of tribute to his friend saying “Ciao Henry” on his helmet.

Championship leader Jenson Button will start from 8th place for Brawn; his worst qualifying of the 2009 season.

Sinkhole reported in Buffalo, New York

Tuesday, September 2, 2008

Buffalo, New York — Officials in Buffalo, New York have closed a portion of a downtown street after a sinkhole was reported. At approximately 4:20 p.m. (Eastern time) Washington street between E. Eagle and Clinton was closed to vehicle and pedestrian traffic. Wikinews was on scene and obtained exclusive photos and statements.

City officials say the sinkhole is located in an area under the road where a tunnel, about 40 feet wide, connects two buildings, formerly the AM&A’s warehouse and department store which is now owned by The Bon-Ton. It was first reported last week when portions of the blacktop were seen caving in near the sidewalks. When city engineers examined the holes, they found it to span the entire width of the street and nearly a half the block’s length with the hole being nearly 15 feet deep. Officials say the only thing holding up the road, is the thin layer of concrete and asphalt that make up the road’s surface.

“I am shocked a car has not went through it (the street)”, said a police officer who was coordinating the blocking effort.

Despite today’s actions, someone who wishes to remain anonymous tells Wikinews that the problems began nearly 10 years ago, and the city was notified then of the sinkhole.

Officials state that the road will be closed for several months and all pedestrian and vehicle traffic will have to be diverted until further notice. It is not yet known when the repairs will begin. The person wishing to remain anonymous says the repairs could take years instead of months.

Elite Boston Marathon runner Emily Levan discusses life and running

Saturday, April 23, 2005

The interview below was conducted by Pingswept over the phone with Emily Levan on April 21, 2005. Levan lives in Wiscasset, Maine, with her husband and daughter, and she ran in the Boston Marathon women’s race on April 18, 2005.

To summarize for our readers, you recently came in 12th in the Boston Marathon, right?

That is correct.

You were the first American finisher.

Yes.

There was also a Russian woman who lives in the US who finished ahead of you.

You know, I believe it is, I’m not actually positive, but I think you’re right. There’s often a lot of foreign runners that live and train in different parts of the US for a variety of reasons. Some live in Colorado and might train at high altitude, or they might have coaches in the US.

OK, but as far as you know, for straight up Americans, people who were born here, who have lived here for long periods of time and are not going anywhere special to train, you were the first finisher.

That is correct.

So congratulations, that’s very impressive. In the rest of your life, my understanding is that you are going to nursing school.

I am. I’m at the University of Southern Maine in Portland. and I have been going to nursing school for a couple years now. I’m just going part time right now because of the baby and other things going on in my world.

Your baby is currently one and a half?

She’s fifteen months.

Fifteen months, so one and one quarter. 1.25, sure.

Hopefully I’ll finish up nursing school in December. That is the tentative plan.

So you’re almost done.

I just have a couple classes left. I’ll take one class this summer and two classes in the fall.

You ran the Boston Marathon originally two years ago?

Actually, I ran it for the first time in 99. I’ve run it four times. I did run it two years ago as well.

You ran it two years ago, and you also came in twelfth then, if not the top American finisher then. You were the fourth?

I think third or fourth. I can’t remember exactly.

How long were you actually training for this marathon in particular?

I’d say about 4 months. I typically try to train about four months for each race. It depends a little bit on what kind of shape I’m in leading up to the training. Four months is usually the time frame I shoot for.

And how many miles a week were you doing–I assume you peaked somewhere right before the marathon.

At the peak, I have a month or six week period where I’ve built up to my peak training, and I was probably doing between 90 to 100 miles a week.

Was there a lot of variation in your day to day mileage, or was it pretty much you’re doing 1/7th of that mileage every day?

There’s definitely variation, probably more so in the type of workout that i did each day. For example two days a week I would do a speed workout, so I might be doing mile repeats, which just means that I do a mile in a specific time, and then I might jog for a couple minutes and then another one and another one. I’d do a series of eight mile repeats on that specific workout day. My other speed workout would be a marathon pace run, so I might run 8 or 10 miles at my marathon pace. If my marathon pace is 6 minute miles, I’d do a two mile jog warm up, and then I might do 8 or 10 miles at a six minute pace, and then a two mile cool down.

So you maybe end up running 14?

Sometimes what I would do on those speed workout days– on those days I might end up with about 14 miles. On some other days, I might run twice during the course of the day. Say in the morning, I might run eight miles, and then in the afternoon I might do six or eight more miles.

Wow.

Those days tend to be a little bit more mellow. More of kind of a maintenance run, a little bit of a recovery day. I try to have a recovery day after every hard workout.

Do you think that all of your training could fit into four hours a day? Do you think that’s true?

You mean the workouts for a specific day? Probably even less than that. Depending on the day a little bit, probably between 2 or 3 hours. Usually on Sunday I would go out and do a long run, and that would be a 20 or 22 mile run, all in one fell swoop and that usually takes two and a half hours.

So that explains how you’re able to do this, as well as go to nursing school, as well as have an extremely young child. I assume you talk to your friends occasionally.

I try to at least– have some sort of social life. This is not a job, so it’s not something that I do 8 hours a day. It’s something that I fit in with all the other obligations, things that I like to do too. I like to be able to pursue other interests as well.

You live on a road with no one else near by. Do you pretty much just run from your house every day?

The winter is harder because with the baby, I often end up running with a treadmill down in the basement. Brad, my husband, has pretty long hours at the farm, and especially in the winter months, it’s hard to find daylight when he’s able to watch Maddy, so I ended up running a lot on the treadmill this winter, as opposed to last summer, I would take her with me. I have one of those baby joggers, and that was great. I could just leave right from the house, and I could take her. She would be pretty happy to go eight or ten miles with me. Typically what I do when I go outside, I just go right from the house. The roads are so pretty around here. We’re pretty secluded, so I don’t have to worry too much about crazy drivers.

Do you ever try to go find big hills to run up and down?

I do. In the past, I have done a hill workout as a part of my training, usually early on in the training during the first six weeks or 2 months of the training I do a hill workout and I would find some place close by that I could find a warm up jog and run to and then do a hill workout. If I couldn’t find one within a couple miles, I would drive to it. It’s a little bit harder now with Maddy because I don’t have as much leeway and freedom with when I go running and where I go running. I’m a little more limited.

You’d have to load up the cart, er, the carriage into the car.

I’ve done that sometimes. Sometimes it’s easier to go straight from home. Running with the jogger up hills is not an easy thing to do.

When you’re in the race, you feel like, “Hey, I’m not even pushing a kid anymore.” Heartbreak Hill without the kid is substantially easier, I suppose.

Yeah.

Do you know most of the elite runners in the race? You know who they are, but are you friends with them, or not really?

It’s funny–I know who people are, but I don’t run that many races to really get to know that many of the runners. If you’re a professional runner, and that’s your job, a lot of those people travel in the same circles. They run the same races and they have the same schedules in terms of when they compete. I pick out a couple of races each year to focus on and because of that, I don’t get to know as many of the runners. As time goes on, you do get a little bit you do get a little more familiar with people.

During the race, do you talk to the other runners, or do you just run along and think things like, “I wish I were at the end right now”?

I think that really depends I find that if I’m feeling good and the run is going well, then it’s easier for me to talk to people, just because you’re feeling strong, and you’re not focusing so much on “I’m not doing so great.” I might talk to some folks along the way. Sometimes if someone passes me, I’ll encourage them and say “Good job, go get them,” and just stuff like that. I certainly find I’m not carrying on lengthy conversations with people because you’re expending energy that should be focused on the race itself. I enjoy getting to know folks along the way and knowing what pace they’re hoping to run.

In races other than the Boston Marathon do you find that you have good competition? I don’t really know what the running scene in Wiscasset, Maine, is like at all, but I imagine that being the fastest female marathon runner in the United States, you might not find a whole lot of competition. You say that you encourage people when they pass you, but having read some of the other interviews with you on the web, it doesn’t seem like people pass you very often.

It definitely depends on the race. Like I said before, I don’t run that many races. At this point, what I’m trying to do is to find races that are competitive so I can be pushed by competition. For example, when I ran the Maine Marathon last fall, there wasn’t a whole lot of competition. That just gets hard. I ran alone for most of the race. Running 26 miles at a fast pace all by yourself without anyone around you to help push you and motivate you, can be pretty hard. Because of that, as I’ve been looking toward the future and thinking about which races I want to do, I’ve been targeting races that will have a little more competition. That’s why Boston was one that I wanted to shoot for and I’m thinking about in the fall going to Chicago because they’ve got a pretty competitive marathon. It’s also a pretty flat course, so people tend to run pretty fast times there.

Most people run a couple of minutes faster in Chicago, right?

Yeah, exactly. And I’ve heard good things about the race too, so I’m looking forward to that.

Have you thought about running internationally?

Not at this point, no. It’s hard to find the time to travel to races, and It gets expensive too. A lot of my family members say, “Wouldn’t it be great to do the London Marathon or the Paris Marathon,” because they like coming to watch. At this point, I think I’m going to stick closer to home. I’ve got a few races, like I was mentioning Chicago, here in the States that I’d really like to do. Maybe once I’ve done those, I might think about something else, it really just depends. A lot of it’s a time issue, because I have other things that I’m pursuing and it gets hard to spend too much time traveling off doing different races.

Do you know Alan Culpepper?

Oh, yeah, yeah.

You at least know of him, right?

Yes, exactly.

Have you ever been in any races against him?

This was the first race that I had run in that he ran in. He was the fourth overall male finisher. That’s a really good showing for an American male. I’ve read a lot about him in different running magazines and just heard a lot about him through running circles. But this was the first time that I’ve actually seen him run. It was neat because in this particular race, they start the women’s elite group about 25 minutes ahead of the rest of the start.

29 minutes actually, I believe.

That’s right, 29 minutes. So, I didn’t see a male runner until pretty close to the end, so it was really neat to see–I think I saw the top five male finishers because they passed me in the last couple miles. It was really interesting–there’s all these cars and press and motorcycles, policemen, so I could tell when the first male was coming up behind me because there was a lot more going on on the course. Alan Culpepper was one of the ones that passed me in the last mile or two. It was pretty neat to see him finishing strong.

You might not be able to beat him in a race but do you think you could maybe, I don’t know, beat him in a fist fight? He’s pretty skinny, right? He only weighs 130 pounds.

I don’t know. I don’t know. I wouldn’t make any bets on it at this point.

No?

No.

OK. Have you thought about doing things longer than a marathon? Like a 50 K or a 100 K?

At this point, I haven’t because I’ve gotten into the marathon, and I’ve really been enjoying that so far. I feel like I still have some room to improve and grow in the marathon, but I think at some point I’d really like to do one of those ultra-type races. For the next several years, I’ll stick towards the marathon distances. Once that competitive part of my life is over, I might move on to something different.

Based on your age, are you likely to peak around now, or you maybe have a few years to go before your legs start to fall off?

Before I can’t walk anymore? I don’t know. It’s really interesting because for marathoning you’ve got a longer life span than in a lot of competitive sports. The fifth place female finisher in Boston this year was over forty. You can still be competitive into your forties. I’m not sure if I’ll keep doing it that long– at least another 3 years or so. One thing in the back of my mind looking at is the Olympic Trials for 2008. I’m looking at that time frame right now. If I want to keep running competitively after that, then I’ll assess things from there.

That sounds good. When you came in as the first American finisher, did you get any certificates or cash or a medal or anything like that?

Yeah, actually, I won $2100.

Oh, great– two thousand bucks!

Which is pretty nice.

That’s a lot of baby clothes.

I know– or a lot of shoes. The shoe expense is pretty expensive, and I’ve been trying to find a shoe company that might give me some shoes.

I would think–couldn’t you just call up New Balance and say, “Hey, look, I’m pretty good, why don’t you give me some shoes?”

Well, this past November, after I ran New York– I usually wear Asics or New Balance– I wrote to both of those companies. I sent them a little running resume. I said I’d be interested in pursuing some sort of sponsorship opportunity, and they both wrote back and said, “Sorry, we don’t have any space or funds available at this time.” I was a little disappointed by that, because I was hoping to at least get someone to help me out with my shoes.

Yeah, at least some sneakers.

But in addition at Boston, they do have these crystal vases that they give out for the top 15 finishers, so I got a little piece of hardware there too.

So you get to put flowers in that.

I had some flowers in it; they’ve wilted so I decided to compost them.

Oh, that’s good.

Yeah, send them back to the earth, you know.

Has anyone else tried to interview you? Local paparazzi following you?

I hide in my car for most of the day. I did some local interviews–with the local NBC affiliate, and I’m going to do an interview tomorrow with the ABC affiliate in Portland, and some affiliated newspaper interviews as well.

You’re officially famous, then.

I don’t know. I guess. It’s been pretty busy.

Has anyone asked you for an autograph yet?

No. No autograph seekers yet, no.

Maybe in the Yellowfront Grocery in Wiscasset? “Hey, I know you!”

“I saw you on TV!” No, not yet.

That’s surely coming. The Chewonki Foundation, which is where you live, recently had Eaton Farm donated to it.

Yes.

And they’re planning on making a 12 mile long trail that runs from approximately your house to Wiscasset.

Oh, you know more about this than I do, that’s great.

I don’t know if it’s going to start right at your front door; you might have to cut through the woods a little bit.

That’s OK, I can do that.

Have you run on trails at all, or is it just, “I want to run on the pavement because I don’t want to twist an ankle”?

I’m not a big trail runner. Maybe it’s because I’m not used to running on trails. Now it would be much more difficult, because I have the baby with me. The baby jogger has some nice wheels on it, but I don’t know if it could handle trail running.

Yeah.

It’s a nice change of pace every once in a while. I don’t worry too much about twisting an ankle–you just have to be careful. I figure I can walk out my door and step in a pothole and twist my ankle, so I don’t worry too much about that. That goes along with being alive in our world. We’ll see. I’m going to have to look into that 12 mile trail.

Because 12 miles, you do that there and back, you’ve got a marathon on your hands.

There you go.

What’s your next target? Can you walk right now?

If I train well, I’m usually not sore. Especially on the long runs, my body gets used to running for that length of time and sure, I’m running faster during the marathon than I do on my long runs, but I think my body tends to adjust to the rigors. It’s usually a good sign if a few days afterwards I don’t have any major soreness. I certainly feel like I’ve done something significant.

Yeah, I can imagine feeling too.

No major aches or pains.

That’s great. What’s your next race? Do you have one targeted? Is it Chicago?

Yeah, I think the next marathon will be Chicago in the fall. there’s a 10 K race, the Beach to Beacon, you may have heard of it.

In Portland?

It’s actually in Cape Elizabeth. It’s put on by Joan Benoit Samuelson. It’s in August, so I’ll probably do that one and then shoot for the fall marathon.

Well, I think that’s all my questions.

Nice, well, thanks for calling. I appreciate it.

Sure, well, thanks for running so fast.

No problem.